Posted in Discussions, Personal Blogs

REVIEW: 2018

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Photo by IMAMA LAVI on Pexels.com

We have come so far in the past year! I started this blog as a hobby, and I’ve been sticking with it! I am so proud of myself for accomplishing so much in just a year!

But enough about me, we’re here to talk about books.

I read a lot of books, comics, and manga that it seems a little overwhelming. I’m going to list the most memorable reads of 2018. These are oldest to newest.

Shark Island by Chris Jameson is the novel that started this crazy ride. It was a fun and thrilling read. Even though it was a bit ridiculous, I still felt the intensity of it all.

Aquaman Vol. 1: The Trench by Geoff Johns when I saw the recent Aquaman movie I instantly thought of this comic. It was so refreshing to see a movie stick to the source material.

The High Climber of Dark Water Bay by Caroline Arden One of the first Advanced Reading Copy novels I read. I loved this novel, and it’s one that I’d like to reread in the future. A good novel for an outdoor-lover.

Delicious in Dungeon Vol. 1 by Ryoko Kui This manga takes a unique take on the dungeon crawler genre. I enjoyed this manga, and I’m eager to read more from this series in the future!

Four Months in Brighton Park by Larry Ehrhorn I was requested to read this book by Mr. Ehrhorn. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. It needs more attention and recognition, so I highly recommend if you love a good “coming of age” story!

2018 was a great year! The start of a reading adventure, and hopefully a future full of more fun and books! Cheers! I hope to see you in 2019!

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Posted in Discussions, Personal Blogs

DISCUSSION: Political Correctness and the Holidays

It seems like every year around the holidays’ people find something to be outraged about. It has gotten to the point where I’m desensitized to it.

I’ve noticed that there’s been outrage around the classic Christmas cartoons Rudolf the Red-nosed Reindeer and Frosty the Snowman. They’re old cartoons. Of course, this shows how much society and our culture has changed. Does this mean we should suppress it? I don’t think so.

I think we should use these classic cartoons as a teaching moment for the kids. Explain that these are classics and they’re old. Teach them whatever you don’t agree about the program, but also show them how simple and happy the cartoons are.

I believe political correctness will become a problem when we start using it to delete the past. We should be able to learn from our mistakes, not try to hide them. History is important to any culture, and to see it disappear saddens me.

I am not a Social Justice Warrior by any means, but I do have a small handful of causes I stand up for. None of which involve trying to ban classic holiday cartoons and classic Christmas songs. Let the holidays be fun, save the Social Justice Warrior stuff for the upcoming year.

Posted in Book Reviews, Novels, Short Story Collections

REVIEW: Straight Outta Tombstone by Various Authors

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*No Spoilers*

Come to visit the Old West, the land where gang initiations, ride-by shootings and territory disputes got their start. But these tales aren’t the ones your grandpappy spun around a campfire unless he spoke of soul-sucking ghosts, steam-powered demons, and wayward aliens.

Here then are seventeen stories that breathe new life in the Old West. Among them: Larry Correia explores the roots of his best-selling Monster Hunter International series in “Bubba Shackleford’s Professional Monster Killers.” Jim Butcher reveals the origin of one of the Dresden Files’ most popular characters in “Fistful of Warlock.” And Kevin J. Anderson‘s Dan Shamble, Zombie P.I., finds himself in a showdown in “High Midnight.” Plus stories from Alan Dean Foster, Sarah A. Hoyt, Jody Lynn Nye, Michael A. Stackpole, and many more.

This is a new Old West and you’ll be lucky to get outta town alive!

I don’t read short story collections very often, I find it difficult to jump into a new story after I feel like I know the main characters. However, when I saw this cover at my local library and saw the cover art, I was sold on the concept.

I enjoy the weird wild west genre. Two genres that are polar opposites colliding for one epic story is fascinating to me! This book has fun with the genre, and it’s an enjoyable read!

All of the short stories in this collection are good, but I had some favorites. And some stories that didn’t impress me. These are all good stories in total, but some just didn’t catch my attention.

My Three Favorites (in no particular order)

  • Bubba Shackleford’s Professional Monster Killers by Larry Correia – The first short story in this collection had charm and had my attention from the beginning. The characters were interesting, and I felt the stakes were dire. I would like to hear more from Bubba Shackleford sometime.
  • The Treefold Problem by Alan Dean Foster – A giant mountain man helps a family who is about to lose their home. I felt like this was inspired by Paul Bunyan, the famous lumberjack. I enjoyed the heart and good feelings in this short story.
  • High Midnight by Kevin J. Anderson – I love film noir. This is the story of a zombie detective who lives in a sort of purgatory with all kinds of monsters and the occasional human. The town is throwing a Wild West-inspired celebration. When things start going south, it’s up to our zombie detective to figure out the mystery.

My Three Least Favorites (in no particular order)

  • Chance Corrigan and the Lord of the Underworld by Michael A. Stackpole – This short story had promise, Chance investigates a mining town to figure out what’s going on. With robots guarding the mine, Chance finds a familiar face running the operation. I think this would have been better if it was its own novel. I felt like the ending was rushed and forced. The way this story ended left me disappointed.
  • The Greatest Guns in the Galaxy by Bryan Thomas Schmidt and Ken Scholes – This is the story behind the cover art. Two aliens come to Earth in the 1800s in search of entertainment. However, when greed gets in the way, it’s up to them to deal with the consequences of their actions. Another interesting premise and I felt like the two aliens that caused the mayhem didn’t learn anything in the end. They just call their friends to help them and boom, everything’s fixed. I found the ending to be unsatisfying and I was disappointed.
  • The Key by Peter J. Wacks – The English Crown hires two hired guns to protect this mysterious object called “The Key” from the Russians. With help from some of history’s famous figures, can the gunmen keep the Russian invaders at bay? I felt like this story belonged somewhere else. This was more British undercover mission than western. I enjoyed the premise and ending well enough, but the lack of the Wild West left me bitter.

I would recommend this book to lovers of westerns, science fiction, fantasy, and short stories. This collection was a perfect addition to my Weird Wild West shelf. I would also recommend this if you are looking for new authors or authors you already enjoy.

More Short Stories HERE!

Posted in Audiobooks, Book Reviews, Novels

REVIEW: Extreme Makeover by Dan Wells

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*No Spoilers*

Lyle Fontanelle is the chief scientist for NewYew, a health and beauty company experimenting with a new, anti-aging hand lotion. As more and more anomalies crop up in testing, Lyle realizes that the lotion’s formula has somehow gone horribly wrong. It is actively overwriting the DNA of anyone who uses it, turning them into physical clones of someone else. Lyle wants to destroy the formula, but NewYew thinks it might be the greatest beauty product ever designed–and the world’s governments think it’s the greatest weapon.

This is a satire turned horror story on how society as a whole treats the beauty industry. Everyone wants to be someone else. Plastic surgery, makeup, hair dye, the list goes on. So the concept of a lotion that can make you look like a model is remarkable.

I found the character development to be really well executed. Lyle grows from being a no confrontation type to being assertive and letting others know what he thinks. Seeing him grow and change throughout the novel made the cliche of one-dimensional character in the horror genre non-existent.

My favorite part of this novel was when Lyle had to face the remaining United Nations delegates, and he made the first step towards him growing as a character. Also listening to the delegates arguing was also funny.

The ending is the only part of the story I had major gripes with. I felt it be out of place and confusing. I won’t spoil the ending for you of course, but I felt like it was unnecessary.

Other than the one small nitpick, I found this novel to be enjoyable and yet terrifying in a realistic fashion. Makeup and beauty is such an important piece in a society that the thought of everyone looking like Tom Cruise or Jennifer Aniston is creepy.

If you enjoy satire and horror, this is worth checking out. I would also recommend this for people who love science fiction. I enjoyed this book and it will definitely be more of the memorable ones that I’ve read.

Posted in Personal Blogs

Holiday Break

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I will have two more book review going up and then I will be taking a break for the holidays.

I will continue to post about various things, but no book reviews until January.

I hope everyone understands and I just want to say, this year has been fantastic! I am looking forward to reviewing my favorite books I’ve read over the year and to share more with you!

Thanks for the love and support!

Don’t forget to follow me on social media!

Twitter: @elishasbooks
Instagram: @elishasbooks
Facebook: Elisha’s Book Review

Posted in Audiobooks, Book Reviews, Novels

REVIEW: Doctor Who: The Holy Terror by Robert Shearman

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*No Spoilers*

The TARDIS lands in a forbidding castle in a time of religious upheaval. The old god has been overthrown, and all heretics are to be slaughtered. Obviously, it isn’t the sort of thing which would happen there every day – just every few years or so.

And when the Doctor and Frobisher are hailed as messengers from heaven, they quickly become vital to opposing factions in their struggle for power. But will they be merely the acolytes of the new order – or will they be made gods themselves?

An evil destructive force is growing deep within the crypt. And the pair soon finds out that they will be lucky to escape their new immortality with their lives.

I am still learning about some of the Classic Doctor Who Doctors. I am not familiar with the 5th-8th Doctors yet. However, I still enjoy reading their spinoff stories.

This audio drama was very interesting. I could imagine the whole story as if it was an actual episode. It was well acted and written.

My favorite character was Frobisher. He was full of good humor and took a major roll in this story. I was a little disappointed when it seemed like Frobisher was overshadowing the Doctor.

One of the instances where I felt Frobisher was overshadowing The Doctor was when the other characters in the story put him into Kinglike and Godlike power over their Kingdom, with that, I found it to be surprised that they didn’t put The Doctor in that position instead since The Doctor is always the main focal character of most of the stories.

With everything that happened in this story, I found it to be well written and the ending wrapped up quite nicely with no loose ends.

If you are looking for a good Doctor Who story, this is your audiobook. I would also recommend this novel for lovers of science fiction and short stories. This audiobook is about two hours long, so its a quick listen if you need something to listen to while waiting on another book.

Read More Doctor Who Reviews Here!